Friday, August 25, 2017

Is life really worth it?

An atheist answers:

Q: At 42 I feel like I've fulfilled my obligations and done everything I needed to do in this world. I'm not sure that it's necessary for me to remain in here any longer. There's really nothing more that I want or need to do. Is it time for me to go?

A: Sure. You have to ask yourself, “what is the point to being alive”. There is no point. Procreating to protect the race against extinction can be handled by the other 7 billion people. Other than that, living is . . . living. What is the point of a tree, a turtle, a bacteria? Why should we be any different?

Q: What is the best thing that’s happened in your life?

A: Living to 76 years old. The alternative is terrible.

Q: Is life really worth it?

A: No. I’m 76. I’ve backpacked through more than 100 countries since 1957, many with my two sons. Started four successful companies. Retired at 45 and again at 49 after stumbling into another successful company. I’m married to an Asian woman 27 years younger than me who was a model in Japan for six years. I can buy what I want, when I want. And, no, it isn’t worth it. Mainly because there really isn’t any point to any of it. I’m sitting in front of my computer at 10:48 pm wasting time typing this reply to you. Why? Is this reply “worth it”? Hell no. Your life at any point in time is the result of memories that don’t exist. There is nothing but “now”. Is “now” worth it? I guess the answer is subjective.

Q: Is it possible to improve myself as a person while homeless? I’ve been pretty financially unstable and crashing on various couches for the last six months, and it’s been very hard to keep up with my spiritual side.

A: Why bother? If you have enough to eat, are in good health, and have a place to crash, why bring on problems by “improving yourself”. Spirituality has nothing to do with bucks. I think you mean “self esteem”, which is highly over-rated. Civilization hasn’t made anyone happier. Owning “stuff” doesn’t make anyone happier. Read, “Richard Corey” online.

"Richard Cory"
Edwin Arlington Robinson

Whenever Richard Cory went down town,
We people on the pavement looked at him:
He was a gentleman from sole to crown,
Clean favored, and imperially slim.

And he was always quietly arrayed,
And he was always human when he talked;
But still he fluttered pulses when he said,
"Good-morning," and he glittered when he walked.

And he was rich—yes, richer than a king—
And admirably schooled in every grace:
In fine, we thought that he was everything
To make us wish that we were in his place.

So on we worked, and waited for the light,
And went without the meat, and cursed the bread;
And Richard Cory, one calm summer night,
Went home and put a bullet through his head.

Friday, August 25, 2017

Is life really worth it?

An atheist answers:

Q: At 42 I feel like I've fulfilled my obligations and done everything I needed to do in this world. I'm not sure that it's necessary for me to remain in here any longer. There's really nothing more that I want or need to do. Is it time for me to go?

A: Sure. You have to ask yourself, “what is the point to being alive”. There is no point. Procreating to protect the race against extinction can be handled by the other 7 billion people. Other than that, living is . . . living. What is the point of a tree, a turtle, a bacteria? Why should we be any different?

Q: What is the best thing that’s happened in your life?

A: Living to 76 years old. The alternative is terrible.

Q: Is life really worth it?

A: No. I’m 76. I’ve backpacked through more than 100 countries since 1957, many with my two sons. Started four successful companies. Retired at 45 and again at 49 after stumbling into another successful company. I’m married to an Asian woman 27 years younger than me who was a model in Japan for six years. I can buy what I want, when I want. And, no, it isn’t worth it. Mainly because there really isn’t any point to any of it. I’m sitting in front of my computer at 10:48 pm wasting time typing this reply to you. Why? Is this reply “worth it”? Hell no. Your life at any point in time is the result of memories that don’t exist. There is nothing but “now”. Is “now” worth it? I guess the answer is subjective.

Q: Is it possible to improve myself as a person while homeless? I’ve been pretty financially unstable and crashing on various couches for the last six months, and it’s been very hard to keep up with my spiritual side.

A: Why bother? If you have enough to eat, are in good health, and have a place to crash, why bring on problems by “improving yourself”. Spirituality has nothing to do with bucks. I think you mean “self esteem”, which is highly over-rated. Civilization hasn’t made anyone happier. Owning “stuff” doesn’t make anyone happier. Read, “Richard Corey” online.

"Richard Cory"
Edwin Arlington Robinson

Whenever Richard Cory went down town,
We people on the pavement looked at him:
He was a gentleman from sole to crown,
Clean favored, and imperially slim.

And he was always quietly arrayed,
And he was always human when he talked;
But still he fluttered pulses when he said,
"Good-morning," and he glittered when he walked.

And he was rich—yes, richer than a king—
And admirably schooled in every grace:
In fine, we thought that he was everything
To make us wish that we were in his place.

So on we worked, and waited for the light,
And went without the meat, and cursed the bread;
And Richard Cory, one calm summer night,
Went home and put a bullet through his head.